U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library

ID. Jackson, W.H. 38

Devils Gate Bridge. The most attractive feature of the canyon is the roar of the waters of the Weber as they roll over the immense masses of rock in its bed, with the rush and tumult of a mountain torrent. For 4 miles we are enclosed with nearly perpendicular walls of gneiss, 2,000 feet in height, forming the central portion of the Wasatch Mountains; the river rushing through it at right angles. The rocks are beautifully banded everywhere. There are also coarse aggregations of quartz and feldspar all along the sides of this channel; and high up on the steep mountain flanks are vast deposits of boulders and fine sand. Weber County, Utah. 1869.

Devils Gate Bridge. The most attractive feature of the canyon is the roar of the waters of the Weber as they roll over the immense masses of rock in its bed, with the rush and tumult of a mountain torrent. For 4 miles we are enclosed with nearly perpendicular walls of gneiss, 2,000 feet in height, forming the central portion of the Wasatch Mountains; the river rushing through it at right angles. The rocks are beautifully banded everywhere. There are also coarse aggregations of quartz and feldspar all along the sides of this channel; and high up on the steep mountain flanks are vast deposits of boulders and fine sand. Weber County, Utah. 1869.

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